We are supported by readers, when you click & purchase through links on our site we earn affiliate commission.

8 Best Cameras for Moms in 2022 [Easy to Use]

If you’re a mom in search of the best camera for family photography, you’ve arrived at the right place. What you need is a camera that’s quick to respond and easy to use. Eye AF is essential here, and a fast burst rate will ensure that you don’t miss those crucial family moments.

Smartphones are fine for most family photos, but since you’re here looking for a digital camera, you’re either dissatisfied or seek better picture quality. As a step-up from smartphone photography, you should aim for something with a large sensor and lens and perhaps manual control for better control of the final image.

Whether you’re a beginner or a pro, I’ve shortlisted a set of digital cameras for moms that will be attuned to your needs. These range from easy-to-use point & shoots with large sensors to mirrorless ILCs that are perfect for more advanced shooters.

8 Best Cameras for Moms in 2022

The moms-friendly cameras here have not just been chosen with all levels of shooters in mind, but also for their image quality and, more importantly, the ability to capture great skin tones.

Whether you’re looking for something pocketable or professional, this list has got you covered. Without further delay, let me review some of the best mom cameras available in the market.

  • Type: Point & Shoot
  • Sensor Resolution: 20.1 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K 30 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 260 Shots
  • Weight: 0.7 lbs

A fast, compact camera with excellent stills and video capabilities, that’s what you get when you choose the Sony ZV-1. Oh, and you also get best-in-class AF (autofocus), 4K video, a superb mic, and a very fast lens for this class of device. Need I say more?

Why is it Suited for Moms?

Sony’s Hybrid AF system with real-time tracking is second to none and the biggest draw of the ZV-1. You’ll find plenty of compact Point & Shoots, but very few can match the sheer capability of the ZV-1 when it comes to AF. Your kids will not escape your camera.

The compact body and its exceptional video capabilities are also perfect for new parents who don’t want the hassle of carrying a monster system around their neck. The ZV-1 will fit easily into a handbag or pouch, making it highly portable.

Sensor & Capabilities

Sony uses a fairly large 1-inch type sensor in the ZV-1. This is a 20.1MP BSI-CMOS sensor with good low-light performance and excellent video features. You also get hybrid AF, a ridiculously fast 24 FPS burst, object tracking with eye AF in stills and video, and more.

Video capabilities include support for 4K 30 footage at 8-bit depth, and a 1000 FPS HD slo-mo mode.

Design & Build

This is a light & compact system that weighs 0.65 lbs and measures 4.25 × 2.38 × 1.75 inches. The camera is designed for one-handed use. Sony has, thoughtfully, incorporated a grip into the design, which makes it easier to grab the camera when shooting. If you like vlogging, the LCD swivels out.

Battery Life & Charging

Battery life for stills is rather low at just 260 shots but good for video at 75 minutes. You’re still going to need spare NP-BX1 batteries for long sessions, though. The device does charge via USB so that you can get by with a power bank in a pinch.

Connectivity

Sony systems have always been great with connectivity. While the ZV-1 doesn’t offer the latest 802.11ac Wi-Fi speeds, it does include 802.11n, which is fast enough for transferring images. USB speeds are limited to 2.0 bandwidth, and you get micro USB.

A micro HDMI port and 3.5 mm mic input round out the inputs.

Should you buy it?

Hands down, Sony ZV-1, is the best camera for moms. It produces great videos, excellent pictures, and has the best autofocus system money can buy. This is a killer combination in the right hands. So, if you’re looking to step up from a smartphone, this is the digital camera to get!

Pros
  • Good grip for a PnS
  • High-quality 4K video
  • 1000-fps slo-mo
  • 24 fps burst mode
  • Interesting mic design
Cons
  • Battery life
  • Data transfer speed
  • Type: Mirrorless ILC
  • Sensor Resolution: 20.9 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K 30 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 300 Shots
  • Weight: 1 lbs

The list begins with a fantastic little body with retro aesthetics. The Nikon Z FC is targeted at a younger audience, which can be sports moms in this case. You get a tonne of control dials, impeccable AF, and excellent image quality. A great mom camera overall.

Why is it Suited for Moms?

While the retro aesthetic is stylish, it’s also functional, giving sports moms a great deal of control over the image with a ton of dials on hand. For sports moms who love photography, this is great because they can spend more time clicking than mucking about in menus.

Another great feature is the inclusion of eye AF in both stills and video. Oh, and this applies to animals as well. Whether it be kits or kids, this system will ensure that all your photos are tack sharp!

Sensor & Capabilities

The 20.9 MP CMOS sensor and Expeed 6 processor have been lifted straight from the Nikon Z50. Image quality is thus very good, as is AF performance, thanks to the processor and the 209 PDAF points you get to choose from.

The device also shoots 11 FPS bursts and oversampled 4K 30 footage. One limitation is that there’s no IBIS, but you can use Nikon Z mount lenses with VR support. Lastly, there’s no flash, so be sure to pack an external unit.

Design & Build

The retro aesthetic isn’t just for show. You get dedicated dials for exposure, ISO, shutter speed, and a fully articulated LCD with touch support. This gives you a great deal of control that doesn’t involve delving through complex menus.

The body itself is available in silver and magnesium alloy build with leatherette patches. As a result, the body is very light at 0.98 lbs. Do note that since it lacks a deep grip, it can be difficult to hold when shooting with large lenses. The body measures 5.31 x 3.7 x 1.73 inches.

Battery Life & Charging

Battery life from the included EN-EL25 battery is only rated at 300 shots per CIPA. This is a conservative estimate, of course, but still low compared to the rival systems. Still, it should be enough for a day’s shooting.

The camera can be charged via USB-C.

Connectivity

Connectivity is excellent as you get high-speed 802.11 ac Wi-Fi support as well as Bluetooth. Data transfer can happen over a 5Gbps USB-C 3.2 Gen 1 port, and there’s a micro HDMI output. There is only mic input, however, and a single UHS-I class SDXC card slot.

Should you buy it?

The Nikon Z FC is a stylish yet functional camera for family photos. With its lightweight body and excellent controls, it’s a great choice for moms who love photography and know their way around systems.

Pros
  • Lightweight body
  • Nikon Z mount
  • Reliable Eye AF
  • Plenty of dials
  • High-speed Wi-Fi
Cons
  • Poor battery life
  • Ergonomics
  • Type: Mirrorless ILC
  • Sensor Resolution: 20.3 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K 60 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 400 Shots
  • Weight: 1.4 lbs

This is more a pro video shooter than a stills cam, but for moms who care about video quality, Panasonic LUMIX G9 is a great choice. Still, image quality is also good, and you get a ridiculous burst rate, so there’s little to worry about on that front.

Why is it Suited for Moms?

For moms who are familiar with the technicalities of shooting stills and video, the LUMIX G9 offers a great deal of control. It’s designed for pro use, so you get a fully customizable set-up that will get you ready for your shot in mere seconds.

Secondly, as a mom, you’re getting an exceptional pro video shooter with best-in-class IBIS and great dynamic range. This is great for shooting kids and family as you can get stable shots without using a tripod or gimbal.

Sensor & Capabilities

The sensor here is a 20.3 micro four-thirds sensor. The smaller size means you get a faster burst rate and lower rolling shutter in the video, and also a faster shutter speed of up to 1/32,000 for freezing those special moments in time.

The device can shoot a 20 FPS burst for 50 frames and a 9 FPS burst for over 600. Coupled with features like focus-stacking and an 80MP high-res mode, it’s clear that this system is more capable than it lets on at first. For video, you get 4K 60 support.

Design & Build

Despite its small sensor, LUMIX G9 is fairly large and measures 5.39 x 3.82 x 3.62 inches in dimensions. It’s also a heavy 1.45 lbs body with a deep grip. It’s thus more comfortable to shoot with than most mirrorless camera bodies. You’ll also find a top-plate LCD and a fully articulated LCD monitor, not to mention a massive 3.7 MDOT EVF.

The body is made of magnesium alloy and completely weather-sealed, so you can be comfortable shooting in any kind of weather at a beach or elsewhere. It can’t take a dip in the water, though.

Battery Life & Charging

CIPA rates the battery life at 400 shots, which is quite decent and enough for a full day of shooting. For video, I’d recommend carrying a spare battery or two, not to mention several spare cards. The DWT-BTC13 battery charges via USB-C.

Connectivity

Connectivity is excellent. You get 802.11ac and Bluetooth, as well as dual 3.5 mm audio jacks and HDMI output. Better yet, you’ll find dual UHS-II class SD cards and a 5 Gbps USB-C port.

Should you buy it?

The LUMIX GX9 isn’t a stereotypical mom camera since it requires a more technical understanding of image quality and controls. This is especially true given the DFD CDAF system that Panasonic uses. However, if you’re familiar with advanced controls or intend to learn, this can be your best family camera.

Pros
  • Excellent ergonomics
  • Fast wireless connectivity
  • Dual SD card support
  • Great video quality
Cons
  • DFD AF is unreliable for video
  • Type: Mirrorless ILC
  • Sensor Resolution: 24 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: FHD 60 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 295 Shots
  • Weight: 0.9 lbs

Here is an entry-level vlogging camera with some great stills capabilities. It’s a few years old at this point so you can grab it at a steep discount. The Canon EOS M6 is small, and the light body is great for moms who are looking for a tiny, mirrorless system for newborn photography.

Why is it Suited for Moms?

Canon’s dual pixel AF system is among the best in the business and has been for years. The M6 promises smooth and fast AF for stills or videos. And when you’re shooting kids and family, it’s an invaluable tool to have.

As well known as DPAF is, of course, Canon color science. This is arguably the best camera for taking pictures of kids, courtesy of the best-in-class color quality. And for quick and easy sharing, that’s all any mom needs.

Sensor & Capabilities

This 24MP CMOS sensor can capture images in a 9 FPS burst at a max shutter speed of 1/4000 sec and a 1/200 sec flash sync speed. It’s an excellent sensor with over 60% DPAF coverage and 49 AF points to choose from. Video, however, is limited to 1080p.

Design & Build

This is a compact body that measures 4.41 x 2.68 x 1.77 inches. It’s also lightweight at 0.86 lbs and built very well yet not weather sealed. You get an articulated LCD that swivels up rather than out to the left and sadly, no EVF. The LCD is great for framing vlogs, but if you have hot/cold-shoe accessories mounted, can get in the way.

Battery Life & Charging

This is one of the first mirrorless ILC systems from Canon, and as with many of the early devices, battery life isn’t that great. The LP-E17 battery in here only manages about 295 shots per CIPA, and I’d recommend you get a spare battery or two to keep handy.

Connectivity

Being an older system, connectivity is relatively slow. The USB port is only rated at USB 2.0 speeds and Wi-Fi at 802.11n. It’s still fast enough for transferring pics, though, and you do get Bluetooth and NFC for quick and easy pairing.

Should you buy it?

Overall, EOS M6 is one of the best canon cameras for family photography to go with their old EF lenses from a DSLR. Given the restrictions of the now-dead EF-M mount, I’d recommend new buyers look elsewhere.

Pros
  • Compact and light
  • Dual Pixel AF system
  • Quality build
  • Canon color science
Cons
  • Battery life
  • 1080p video
  • Type: Mirrorless ILC
  • Sensor Resolution: 16 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K 30 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 290 Shots
  • Weight: 0.9 lbs

As expected from Panasonic, this is another video-focused system with retro aesthetics. The LUMIX GX85 is small, and the light body was classified as one of the top mid-range cameras at the time it launched 5-6 years ago and is a great deal even today.

Why is it Suited for Moms?

Moms who know their cameras will love the plethora of customizable controls and dials on offer. Coupled with an impressive dual IS 2 system and AF tracking, you’re virtually guaranteed a steady, in-focus shot.

The design is great as well, aesthetically speaking, and the body won’t look out of place at family gatherings. It’s also small and light enough to toss into a handbag without much concern about weight.

Sensor & Capabilities

Panasonic uses the more popular 16MP micro four-thirds sensor of the time. It’s a good sensor with no AA filter and a redesigned shutter that eliminates shutter shock. Coupled with the Venus engine processor, images don’t show moire—wavy interference patterns in scenes with a lot of texture.

Additionally, if you’re using this camera for baby photography, I’d recommend shooting in RAW. As many photographers have pointed out, the image processing algorithms of this system tend to slightly desaturate skin tones.

Design & Build

The retro design of the GX85 works great for a compact digital camera. You get tons of dials and buttons, all of which are customizable, and a good weight, 0.94 lbs, to be precise. The leatherette panels can be slippery, though. There is no weather sealing.

The 3-inch LCD tilts but doesn’t swivel, and there’s a 2.8 MDOT EVF if you want to use it. That EVF can get distracting when shooting bursts, though, as its 16:9 aspect ratio and design is geared towards video work. The body measures 4.8 x 2.8 x 1.73 inches.

Battery Life & Charging

The included lithium-ion battery charges via USB, but strangely, Panasonic chose not to include a charger in the package. Make sure you get a USB-PD charger when you buy the system. With a CIPA rating of about 290 shots, battery life is just about average.

Connectivity

This is an old body, so don’t expect too much in terms of connectivity. You’re getting fast 802.11m Wi-Fi and NFC, but only USB 2.0 speeds and no mic input or headphone out. There is micro HDMI, however. It supports a single UHS-I class SD card.

Should you buy it?

The GX85 is an older Panasonic body that still does a fantastic job of capturing video and stills. Its DFD AF system is surprisingly effective for a CDAF system and tracks well. As long as you understand cameras, this can be a great tool to use for kid photography.

Pros
  • Excellent IBIS system
  • No shutter shock
  • Superb 4K video quality
  • 6 FPS burst with AF-C
Cons
  • USB 2.0 transfer speed
  • No charge
  • Type: Point & Shoot
  • Sensor Resolution: 20.1 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K 30 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 220 Shots
  • Weight: 0.7 lbs

Think of the RX100VA as a budget ZV-1. It features a similar lens and sensor and is just as capable when it comes to images and video. What Sony RX100VA misses out on is unlimited video recording, the ZV-1’s fancy new mic, and a bunch of other refinements.

Why is it Suited for Moms?

Just like the ZV-1, the RX100VA is a superb compact zoom that moms will have no issues carrying with them wherever they go. Image and video quality is a significant step up from any smartphone, and you’re getting a great slo-mo mode to boot.

Of course, Sony’s incredible AF system is present here as well. Whether you’re shooting hyper-active kids or animals, this system will ensure that your subject stays in focus at all times. You’ll spend less time fiddling with dials than shooting, which is great.

Sensor & Capabilities

Sony’s using a 20.1MP stacked CMOS sensor here. This allows the system to accommodate an incredible 24 FPS burst rate with a deep buffer. When shooting kids, you’ll be able to capture every moment of the action.

You’re also getting a 24-70 mm equivalent F1.8-2.8 lens, a 315 pt hybrid AF system, 4K 30 video, and ultra-slo-mo thanks to that deep buffer and stacked sensor.

Design & Build

Sony’s RX series has always been compact rectangles with poor handling, and this one’s no different. That poor handling is only a result of the camera’s diminutive size, i.e., 4 x 2.3 x 1.6 inches, however, and isn’t something to complain about. For framing, you get a tilting LCD and pop-up EVF. The body weighs a mere 0.65 lbs.

Battery Life & Charging

The NP-BX1 battery here is tiny, and as a result, battery life is correspondingly low at just 220 shots CIPA. Carry a USB-PD-rated power bank with you at all times, and you won’t have to worry, though.

Connectivity

Connectivity is limited to USB 2 speeds and micro HDMI (compressed 4K output), but you get 802.11n Wi-Fi with NFC. Sadly, there are no audio ports, so you can’t plug in an external mic or pair of headphones for monitoring.

Should you buy it?

The RX100VA is a great family camera if you can get it for much lower than the ZV-1’s selling price. It’s just as capable when it comes to stills and video and only loses out on more advanced features that amateur photographers likely don’t need. It’s a good, compact, and easy to use camera for moms.

Pros
  • Compact body
  • Excellent AF system
  • Fast lense
  • Ultra slo-mo support
Cons
  • Poor battery life
  • Type: Point & Shoot (superzoom)
  • Sensor Resolution: 18.1 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K 30 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 330 Shots
  • Weight: 1.4 lbs

This is a compact superzoom system with a fairly small sensor and a massive lens. The Panasonic LUMIX FZ80 would be more suited to older moms who can’t quite keep up with their kids and need to photograph them from a distance at, say, the beach.

Why is it Suited for Moms?

The 1200mm equivalent zoom lens on the FZ80 offers great reach, allowing you to zoom in on your kids’ faces while lounging on a deck chair several hundred feet away. When they get close, you can switch to the much wider 20mm focal length.

The system is also a lot easier to use and maintain than an equivalent mirrorless system with a similar lens. It’s perfect for moms who don’t like messing with settings but want the flexibility of a mirrorless ILC system.

Sensor & Capabilities

The 18 MP BSI-CMOS sensor in her is a tiny 1/2.3-inch system that’s only slightly larger than the ones you’ll find in a flagship smartphone. That said, it shoots excellent stills and video (at up to 4K 30p) and can handle a 10 fps burst.

Design & Build

Given the sensor size, this is a fairly large body measuring 5.12 x 3.7 x 4.69 inches and weighing 1.36 lbs. But that’s to be expected given the monster 60x zoom lens it’s packing. There’s a 3” LCD for framing but it’s not articulated, and a 0.2” LCD EVF that should help in low-light.

The size and weight of the body should make for a stable shooting platform, though.

Battery Life & Charging

Rated at 330 shots from the included 895 mAh battery, I’d say battery life is just above average. This is only when using the LCD, though, as battery life drops further to 240 shots when using the EVF. Depending on how yo0yu shoot, you’re going to need a spare battery or two.

Connectivity

Connectivity is limited to micro USB at USB 2.0 speeds, micro HDMI, and a single SDXC UHS-I class card slot. You get 802.11n Wi-Fi with NFC, but no audio input or output, ruling out external mic support.

Should you buy it?

If you’re a mom who needs a compact superzoom, the FZ80 is worth checking out, especially for the price it’s going for. You will be compromising on image quality and AF performance, but if you like the zoom range and price, that trade-off is worth it.

Pros
  • Incredible 60x zoom range
  • Comfortable body
  • Decent battery life
  • 10 fps burst
Cons
  • Slow AF
  • Soft images
  • Type: Point & Shoot
  • Sensor Resolution: 20.2 MP
  • Max Video Resolution: FHD 30 FPS
  • Battery Life: Up to 295 Shots
  • Weight: 0.4 lbs

This is a more traditional Point & Shoot camera with a versatile zoom range and a well-rounded feature set for most use-cases. Canon PowerShot SX620 is not the best at anything, but it’s good value and will beat any smartphone when it comes to zoom range and flash photography.

Why is it Suited for Moms?

Image quality is a step up from smartphones, and that built-in flash should help greatly in low light. This makes the SX620 HS a great choice for moms who don’t have a flagship smartphone and don’t want to spend too much.

As a quick, easy to use point & shoot on a budget, the SX620 is hard to beat and a great choice for moms taking their first steps in photography.

Sensor & Capabilities

Considering that this is a much older system, image quality from the 1/2.3” 20.2 MP BSI-CMOS sensor isn’t half bad. It can’t compete with smartphones for HDR and low-light photography, but it has a good zoom range (625 mm equivalent) and a powerful enough flash for indoor use.

You’re also getting an intelligent OIS system and a 9-point CDAF system with face tracking. Though bursts are limited to 2.5 FPS, so use this as a single-shot camera.

Design & Build

The compact design of the SX620 HS houses a fixed 3” LCD. There’s no touch-input support or an EVF, but that’s alright given the capabilities of the system. Buttons are limited to the bare minimum and with little customizability.

The camera measures 3.81 x 2.24 x 1.1 inches and weighs 0.4 lbs.

Battery Life & Charging

At 295 shots, battery life is quite decent from a system this small and light. The NB-13L battery needs to be charged externally, though, so be sure to keep a couple of spares handy when you’re traveling.

Connectivity

The PowerShot SX620 supports SDXC cards for data capture. Outputs are restricted to micro USB at USB 2.0 bandwidth and 802.11n Wi-Fi with NFC support. A micro HDMI port allows images and video to be streamed to a TV, but there are no audio ports for output or mic input.

Should you buy it?

While I’d recommend that most moms looking at the SX620 HS stick to their smartphones, I can recommend it to those who don’t have expensive flagship phones and are looking for an inexpensive upgrade for photographing their kids.

Pros
  • Ultra-compact
  • 802.11n Wi-Fi with NFC
  • Decent battery life
  • Good zoom range
Cons
  • Low light performance
  • No HDR support

Camera Buying Guide for Moms

As a mom looking to shoot kids and family, you need a system that is quick and easy to use and something that isn’t too heavy. For most of you, I’d recommend a high-end Point and Shoot. Advanced users do have plenty of mirrorless ILC bodies to choose from.

Video features are, I think, secondary as most smartphones will shoot better video thanks to the OIS-based sensors. That said, if you know your way around cameras, the extra effort that goes into using an ILC is worth your while.

Types of Cameras

TypeDescriptionRecommendation
Point-n-shootA compact, easy-to-use camera system with an integrated lens.Best for moms who are not too familiar with cameras and want an upgrade from a smartphone
Superzoom point-n-shootThese are a dying breed but can be had for cheap. They feature 25-60x zoom capabilities and more.I’d avoid these unless you know you’re going to need that zoom range.
Mirrorless ILCThese are mirrorless cameras with large sensors and interchangeable lenses.Best for advanced shooters and moms who know their way around cameras.

Features to Consider

As a mom, I’d recommend you primarily look at form factor and AF performance when finding the best camera for at-home photography. The form factor determines the type of body you’re comfortable carrying, and a good AF system will let you quickly snap pics without wasting time in setup.

Next, you need to look at burst rate and IBIS. Kids move around a lot, and precious moments and expressions can vanish in the blink of an eye. That’s why you need a good burst rate and deep buffer. Anything over 6 FPS is acceptable. IBIS, of course, will keep your shots stable.

Zoom and sensor resolution are largely irrelevant. Most systems feature 20MP sensors, and since most moms aren’t going to be too far away from their kids, zoom isn’t going to be of much use either. If you know you’re going to need a good zoom range, be sure to figure out exactly how much you need as longer zooms tend to offer worse image quality.

Camera Design

Size and portability are factors you need to consider because, as a mom, you might end up already carrying a ton of kid-focused paraphernalia. If you don’t want the additional weight, a compact Point & Shoot will do. A mirrorless ILC will get you far better image quality if you don’t mind the weight and size.

Storage & Battery Life

Storage isn’t a concern since any camera these days records to SDXC cards. Be sure to carry spares, ditto batteries. Running out of storage or charge is the last thing you want to happen when you’re out with kids and family.

Frequently Asked Questions

What type of camera is the easiest to use?

Point & Shoot cameras are the easiest to use, but mirrorless cameras are more rewarding if you want to take the trouble to learn how to use them.

What is the best mom camera to capture baby moments?

A fast PnS camera or good ILC is perfect for capturing baby moments. A fast PnS with video capabilities and good AF is even better.

How do I choose a good camera for family use?

Pick a system with good AF and a form factor you’re comfortable using. There’s no point in buying an expensive camera if it’s too uncomfortable to carry with you.

Should moms focus on camera brands?

Unless you’ve invested in a certain lens ecosystem, no. Focus on features and capabilities instead.

Verdict

For most mom photographers, I’d recommend going with incredible Sony ZV-1. This tiny little beast packs in an exceptional sensor, a fast lens, and the best AF system money can buy. It also has excellent video capabilities and is pocketable, making it the perfect all-rounder.

  • If you’re an advanced shooter, go with the Nikon Z FC. It features a modern lens mount and exceptional image quality for its price.
  • For high-quality video, go with the Panasonic LUMIX G9. The camera does take some getting used to, and you’ll need to figure out manual focus, but video from the camera is sublime.

To all the moms out there, all I’ll say is that you need to pick a camera that works for you, something that fits into your lifestyle, something that you’ll have fun shooting with. Don’t get caught up in specs or intimidated by design. To that end, I hope you found this list useful.